St Patrick – Kiss me – ROW

View more St. Patricks Day designs, styles and colors

Lie down with dogs and you’ll rise with fleas.

Thirst is the end of drinking and sorrow is the end of drunkenness.

Your health one and all, from one wall to the other, And you outside there speak up, brother!

Nature breaks through the eyes of the cat.

You must live with a person to know a person. If you want to know me come and live with me.

100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! Printed in the USA! Click on the shirt to get yours...
[ St Patrick – Kiss me – ROW ].

Read more: What Irish phrases you need to learn before you visit Ireland

Time is a good storyteller.

On me tod: A lonely lad says, "I'm on me tod," if he's riding solo at the bars that night, or alone in general. Tod Sloan was an American jockey whose mother died when he was young, whose father abandoned him, and whose incredibly successful horse-racing career came to an end when he moved to the U.K. and was ridiculed for his Western riding style. Sloan was always said to be "on his own.". This expression is one of the best-known examples of Cockney rhyming slang, a phrase construction that involves taking a common word and using a rhyming phrase of two or three words to replace it. "On my Tod Sloan" rhymes with "on my own"; but in typical Cockney fashion, the word that completes the rhyme ("Sloan") is omitted.

Sláinte!: In an Irish pub, patrons toast each other sláinte (pronounced "slaan-sha") as they clink glasses of Guinness. Derived from the Old Irish adjective slán (which means "safe"), sláinte literally translates as "health" and is used as a stand-in for the more time-consuming "I drink to your health!"

Related Posts

Comments are closed