HAMZA ABDULLAH PATRICK’S DAY IRISH SHAMROCK

Hamza Abdullah Patrick's Day Irish ShamrockHamza Abdullah Patrick’s Day Irish Shamrock

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What's the craic?: Greetings like "Any craic?" and "How's the craic?" give rise to potential awkward misunderstandings for tourists, because craic is pronounced like "crack." The most straightforward definition is fun or enjoyment, and it can substitute for "How are you?" A typical response is "divil a bit," which means "not much."

The older the fiddle, the sweeter the tune.

May those who love us, love us. And those that don't love us, May God turn their hearts. And if He doesn't turn their hearts, May he turn their ankles. So we'll know them by their limping.

Who keeps his tongue keeps his friends.

Here's to women of the Irish shore; I love but one, I love not more. But since she's not here to drink her part, I'll drink her share with all my heart.

Hamza Abdullah Patrick's Day Irish ShamrockHamza Abdullah Patrick’s Day Irish Shamrock

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[ HAMZA ABDULLAH PATRICK’S DAY IRISH SHAMROCK ].

May the cat eat you, and may the devil eat the cat: Consider this insult a double whammy. By saying, "Go n-ithe an cat thĂș is go n-ithe an diabhal an cat," the speaker wishes that a cat gobble up his enemy like a can of Fancy Feast, and that the Devil eat them both. It's a surefire sentence to Hell. Curses are far more detailed and nuanced in Irish culture, as compared to the traditional F-bombs dropped in the U.S. Here's another popular mouthful of an insult: "May you be afflicted with itching without the benefit of scratching." Burn.

Mothers [fathers] hold their children's hands for just a little while... And their hearts forever.

On me tod: A lonely lad says, "I'm on me tod," if he's riding solo at the bars that night, or alone in general. Tod Sloan was an American jockey whose mother died when he was young, whose father abandoned him, and whose incredibly successful horse-racing career came to an end when he moved to the U.K. and was ridiculed for his Western riding style. Sloan was always said to be "on his own.". This expression is one of the best-known examples of Cockney rhyming slang, a phrase construction that involves taking a common word and using a rhyming phrase of two or three words to replace it. "On my Tod Sloan" rhymes with "on my own"; but in typical Cockney fashion, the word that completes the rhyme ("Sloan") is omitted.

May you be poor in misfortune, rich in blessings, slow to make enemies and quick to make friends. And may you know nothing but happiness from this day forward.

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