AMERICAN Grown with IRISH Roots

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A hound's food is in its legs.

God's help is nearer than the door.

May the joys of today Be those of tomorrow. The goblets of life Hold no dregs of sorrow.

May the roof above you never fall in, and those gathered beneath it never fall out.

You're not as young as you used to be. But... You're not as old as you're going to be. So watch it!

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[ AMERICAN Grown with IRISH Roots ].

Two people shorten the road: Company makes the journey fly, as evidenced by one anecdote from Celtic folklore. In it, a father asks his son to "shorten their journey" to see the king, and refuses to continue on foot when the son doesn't know how. Frustrated, the son asks his wife what to do. "Every one knows that storytelling is the way to shorten a road," she says. They set out the next morning, and the son weaves a tale the whole way to White Strand. Lesson learned: Giorraíonn beirt bóthar.

May the road rise up to meet you: You may recognize this popular blessing (in Irish Gaelic: Go n-éirí an bóthar leat) from Catholic weddings or cross-stitched pillows in Nan's house. One of the main characteristics of Celtic Christianity is the use of images of nature to show how God interacts with people. "May the road rise up to meet you/ May the wind be always at your back/ May the sun shine warm upon you face ..." uses everyday images to mean, may God remove obstacles in your journey through life.

The tiredness leaves but the profit remains.

State o'you: A popular exclamation used in inner Dublin, "Look at the state o'you!" implies that a person's attire, personal hygiene, intoxication level, or general demeanor is worrisome. One might describe his drinking companion as being in a "bleedin' state" if he "gets pissed" or "wrecked" on lager at the pub.

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